Healthy Tan or Damaged Skin? How to Detect and Prevent Sun Damage

The sun emits harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation, which can result in skin damage from freckles and cosmetic blemishes to more serious conditions like cancer. Sun damage doesn’t happen overnight, and the long-term effects of repeated sun exposure may not appear for years. It’s a gradual process brought on by repeated exposure to the sun’s harmful rays, which can have serious consequences later in life. But it's never too late to start protecting your skin from sun damage!

Signs of Sun Damaged Skin

Tans or sunburns are two visible signs of sun damage. A tan reveals that your skin has attempted to protect itself from sun damage by producing melanin, the brown pigment that colors the outer layer of skin. And sunburns indicate damaged skin cell DNA, which increases your risk for skin cancer.

The following signs indicate sun-damaged skin.

The best way to maintain a youthful appearance and avoid skin cancer is to make sun protection a part of daily life. Take extra precautions when outdoors. Always apply sunscreen and wear protective clothing, such as hats and sunglasses. Limit the amount of time you spend in direct sunlight and seek shade when possible. Tanning beds are just as harmful for your skin and should also be avoided.

When to Visit Your Dermatologist

Sun damage should not be overlooked. It may be time to visit your dermatologist about potential sun damage if you:

At a minimum, you should visit a dermatologist once a year to have your body inspected for moles or growths. A dermatologist will not only look for signs of cancer, but can also offer cosmetic treatments to reduce the visible signs of sun damage, such as wrinkles, fine lines and age spots.

You Might Also Enjoy...

Dysport

Dysport is a prescription injection to temporarily inhibit moderate to severe wrinkles.

DERMASWEEP PROMOTION!!!

Dermasweep is the 30-minute procedure to help restore and reduce skin aging process with No downtime!   

What Is Impetigo?

Find out more about this common childhood bacterial skin infection and how to treat it.Most people don’t know what impetigo is.

Understanding and Treating Eczema

If you notice recurring bouts of red, scaly, itchy patches of skin then you could be dealing with eczema. Eczema refers to a variety of skin conditions that cause plaques that can sometimes ooze, crust over, and lead to infection.

Treating Shingles

As kids, we dealt with that notoriously itchy rash caused by chickenpox. Unfortunately, as we get older, the same virus that caused our childhood chickenpox can also cause shingles.